Page 118 - ASHG 2013 Program Guide

INVITED AND PLATFORM SESSIONS  
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INVITED AND PLATFORM SESSIONS
Thursday, October 24
6:45
PM
–7:45
PM
SESSION 44 – ASHG Next: The Future of Genetics and
the Future of Your Society
Room 253, Level 2, Convention Center
Moderators
:
Jeff Murray, Univ. of Iowa; Cynthia C.
Morton, Brigham and Women’s Hosp
ASHG is currently engaged in strategic planning
that will guide the Society for the next three to five
years. Join fellow ASHG members, the elected
leadership, and the staff to help chart the future of
your professional society. Come prepared to discuss
the role of ASHG in the future of human genetics and
genetic medicine and to provide your thoughts on
the annual meeting, the
American Journal of Human
Genetics
,
and new services for members.
This session is interactive. Be sure to bring your fully-
charged mobile device, with the audience response
app downloaded. In advance of the session, go to the
iTunes store, Android Market or Blackberry Market
to download the ResponseWareapp. You can also
scan the QR code below or go to
to
participate. Enter ASHG as the session I.D. Keypads
are available to those without a mobile device. Light
refreshments will be available.
Thursday, October 24
4:30
PM
–6:30
PM
Concurrent Invited Session II (37-43)
SESSION 43 – Nonhuman Primate Genomics:
Evolutionary Insights and Relevance to Human
Phenotypes
Room 253, Level 2, Convention Center
Moderators
:
Jeffrey M. Kidd, Univ. of Michigan; Tomas
Marques-Bonet, CSIC-Univ. Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona
In the last 20 years, there have been tremendous
advances in our understanding of the genetic diversity
of the human species. However, a systematic effort to
obtain comparable datasets for other primates species
(
great apes, Old World monkeys and New World
monkeys) has been somewhat forgotten. Human
variation can only be interpreted if we have a complete
understanding of the biological processes that shape
it. In the last years, greatly aided by advances in
sequencing capacities, research in primate genomics
has expanded such that the field of primate population
genomics has emerged. The benefits of such efforts
are multifaceted and include a variety of disciplines
in biology including human evolution and the use
of primates as model organisms to study human
diseases. This symposium brings together expert
talks from the broad categories of genome evolution,
population genetics, and complex trait genetics to
describe recent advances in primate population
genomics and to relate the continued relevance of
non-human primates for understanding human genetic
diversity.
4:30
PM
Great ape versus human genetic diversity:
The Great Ape Genome Project.
T. Marques-Bonet.
CSIC-Univ. Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona.
5:00
PM
Where ancestry runs deep: Ancient
balancing selection in humans.
M. Przeworski. Univ.
of Chicago.
5:30
PM
Genomic insights into chromosomal
evolution in Gibbons.
L. Carbone. Oregon Hlth. & Sci.
Univ.
6:00
PM
Mapping complex traits in non-human
primates.
N. Freimer. UCLA.