Page 95 - ASHG 2012 Annual Meeting Program Guide

84
INVITED AND PLATFORM SESSIONS
Taking photographs or sound recordings in all meeting rooms is strictly prohibited. Thank you for your cooperation.
Thursday, November 8
8:00
AM
–10:00
AM
Concurrent Invited Session II (21-28)
SESSION 25 – Genomic Medicine: ELSI Goes
Mainstream
Room 132, Lower Level North, Moscone Center
Moderators
:
Wylie Burke, Univ. of Washington; James
P. Evans, Univ. of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Next-generation sequencing of the human genome
has the potential to predict disease risk, identify
disease causation, and refine therapeutic interventions.
As research-based sequencing moves into clinical
practice, however, a number of ethical and social
questions will enter mainstream practice, and will need
to be addressed in a practical manner to inform best
practices. For example, how do key stakeholders
(
patients, providers, researchers, and the public) view
the risks and benefits of genome sequencing, and how
can benefits be optimized and risks mitigated? How
do we address children’s rights as well as other family
members’ rights with respect to potentially shared
information learned from sequencing individuals?
Empirical data can contribute to a better
understanding of these issues; but what kinds of data
are most relevant and how can they be used to inform
practice and policy? How do we navigate the
increasingly blurred line between research and clinical
care? These issues will be discussed and empirical
data presented by a panel of experts investigating the
ethical and social issues of genome sequencing in a
variety of research and patient populations.
8:00
AM
Views of patients, parents of patients,
and clinicians toward whole genome sequencing
for clinical care management.
A. A. Lemke. Med.
Col. of Wisconsin.
8:30
AM
My46: An innovative web-based
approach to managing and returning results from
exome and whole genome sequencing.
H. K. Tabor.
Seattle Children’s Hosp.
9:00
AM
Returning “actionable” results to family
members in a pancreatic cancer biobank: Views of
probands and family members.
B. Koenig. Sch. of
Nursing, UCSF.
9:20
AM
Approaches and attitudes on return of
WGS/WES results.
K. Ormond. Stanford Univ.
9:40
AM
Next steps in development of best
practices for use of genome sequencing in clinical
care.
A. McGuire. Baylor Col. of Med.
Thursday, November 8
8:00
AM
10:00
AM
Concurrent Invited Session II (21-28)
SESSION 26 – Model Organism Genetics, Human
Biology and Human Disease
Gateway Ballroom 103, Lower Level South, Moscone
Center
Moderators
:
Phil Hieter, Univ. of British Columbia; Hal
Dietz, Johns Hopkins Univ. Sch. of Med.
Yeast, worms, flies, zebrafish, and mice are key
model’ organisms that offer powerful experimental
approaches for the study of biological processes
relevant to human biology and disease. The genome
sequencing projects of the 1990s reemphasized the
striking extent to which all organisms are built from the
same genes, and highlighted the enormous value of
model experimental organisms for the study of
evolutionarily conserved gene function. Few, if any,
processes at the gene level are known to be unique to
humans. Indeed, key aspects of most human
disorders can be modeled in experimentally tractable
organisms through the analysis of orthologous genes
and pathways, using the genetic, biochemical and cell
biological toolboxes that have been developed in each
model organism. This symposium will accent the
current relevance of model organism studies for the
understanding, diagnosis, and treatment of human
disease, and anticipate the future role of model
organisms in human disease research. We chose to
highlight a diverse set of biological processes and
experimental systems to make the point that the
principles of cross species analysis of basic gene
function extend to the study of all human disorders.
8:00
AM
Budding yeast: Lessons from yeast
applied to the study of human genetic diseases of
protein traffic.
R. Schekman. Univ. of California,
Berkeley.
8:30
AM
The nematode worm: Mechanisms
regulating aging in worms and man.
C. Kenyon.
UCSF.
9:00
AM
The zebrafish: Zebrafish heart
development and function.
D. Stainier. Max Planck
Inst. for Heart and Lung Res., Bad Nauheim, Germany.
9:30
AM
The laboratory mouse: Mouse models of
glaucoma and retinal ganglion cell loss.
S. John.
HHMI/The Jackson Lab., Bar Harbor, ME.