Page 133 - ASHG 2012 Annual Meeting Program Guide

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INVITED AND PLATFORM SESSIONS
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Saturday, November 10
9:40
AM
–11:40
AM
Concurrent Invited Session III (73-80)
SESSION 78 – Stem Cells and Personalized Medicine
Room 135, Lower Level North, Moscone Center
Moderator
:
Stephen H. Tsang, Columbia Univ.
Speakers will discuss applications of patient-specific
and disease-specific stem cell lines, including disease
modeling, drug screening, and regenerative medicine.
Panelists will bring experience in clinical genetics,
genetic manipulation in stem cells, and disease
modeling. The FDA has recently approved phase I/II
clinical trials to investigate the safety and efficacy of
embryonic stem cell-based retinal cell transplantation,
but such therapy requires immunosuppression.
Patient-specific stem cells may offer an alternative to
embryonic stem cells that will skirt the need for
immunosuppressive therapy as well as the social and
political ramifications of embryonic stem cell research,
but their utility even extends far beyond such
groundbreaking advances.
9:40
AM
Stem cells and personalized medicine in
retinal degenerations.
S. H. Tsang. Columbia Univ.
10:10
AM
Direct reprogramming to generate
patient-specific stem cells and neurons.
M. Wernig.
Stanford Sch. of Med.
10:40
AM
A chemical approach to controlling cell
fate.
S. Ding. UCSF.
11:10
AM
Patient-specific stem cells and
cardiovascular genetics.
B. Conklin. UCSF.
Saturday, November 10
9:40
AM
–11:40
AM
Concurrent Invited Session III (73-80)
SESSION 79 – Should Noninvasive Prenatal Diagnosis
Augment or Replace Current Prenatal Screening and
Diagnosis?
Room 124, Lower Level North, Moscone Center
Moderators
:
Mark E. Nunes, Kaiser Permanente, San
Diego; Mildred K. Cho, Stanford Univ.
The discovery of circulating cell-free fetal nucleic acid
(
cffDNA) in maternal blood plasma in 1997 allowed for
the development of noninvasive prenatal diagnosis
(
NIPD) offered commercially in a medical setting in
North America beginning in October 2011. From the
initial discovery, ethical issues were raised in that
the method could most easily be validated seeking
circulating Y chromosome transcripts. The method
subsequently has been validated for fetal Rh typing
and fetal aneuploidy, but the next-generation
sequencing methods used to analyze cffDNA allow
any Mendelian trait or disorder with a known gene to
be detected by the method. This technology
convergence, coupled with the test being offered at
10-
weeks gestation, could provide a level of access
and choice in women’s reproductive decision making
unprecedented since the introduction of oral
contraception. We will briefly introduce the topic, and
then debate the ethical, legal, and social issues of
broadening the scope and availability of NIPD. The
technique will be placed in the context of the history
of seeking fetal markers and cells in maternal
circulation. The ethical context will be outlined, with
competing issues of autonomy and societal interest.
The legal context, within the current debate
surrounding reproductive freedom, will be discussed.
The possible impact on society and medical practice
will be described.
9:40
AM
Lessons from the clinical introduction of
noninvasive prenatal diagnosis: How we got here.
A. T. Bombard. Sequenom Inc., San Diego.
10:05
AM
Cell-free fetal DNA in prenatal diagnosis:
Where we are going?
D. Bianchi. Tufts Univ., Boston.
10:30
AM
Academia and industry in the
development of noninvasive prenatal diagnosis.
M.
K. Cho. Stanford Univ.
10:55
AM
Ethical and policy implications of early
noninvasive prenatal diagnosis.
J. S. King. UC
Hastings Col. of the Law, San Francisco.
11:20
AM
Discussion.
M. E. Nunes. Kaiser
Permanente, San Diego.