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Friday, October 14
10:30
AM
–12:30
PM
Concurrent Invited Session III (45-50)
SESSION 46 – Mechanisms of Embryonic Development
and Organogenesis: Insights into Human Birth Defects
Room 517A, Level 5, Convention Center
Moderator:
Anthony Wynshaw-Boris, Univ. of
California, San Francisco Sch. of Med., USA
The purpose of the session is to present contemporary
state-of-the-art ideas about developmental biology
mechanisms and pathways, relevant to human genetic
disease and birth defects. Four internationally
recognized speakers will give a broad overview of the
current thinking and research in this area. They will
speak about developmental mechanisms in model
organisms, but also will relate their findings to human
genetic disease and birth defects as this will be most
relevant to the audience.
10:30
AM
Introduction.
A. Wynshaw-Boris. UCSF
Sch. of Med., USA.
10:40
AM
Left-right asymmetry and its inborn
errors.
H. Hamada. Grad. Sch. of Frontier Biosci,
Osaka Univ., Japan.
11:05
AM
Primary cilia and Hedgehog signaling.
K.
Anderson. Sloan Kettering Inst., New York, USA.
11:30
AM
Formation of the vertebral column: From
clocks to scoliosis.
O. Pourquie. IGBMC, Strasbourg,
France.
11:55
PM
X-linked lethal mutations: Mouse models
of human congenital syndromes.
J. Rossant. Hosp.
for Sick Children Res. Inst., Toronto, Canada.
12:20
PM
Queston and answers.
A. Wynshaw-Boris.
UCSF Sch. of Med., USA.
Cameras and all other recording devices are
strictly prohibited
in all session rooms. Thank you for your cooperati
Friday, October 14
10:30
AM
–12:30
PM
Concurrent Invited Session III (45-50)
SESSION 47 – One and the Same? Twins, Epigenetic
and the Elucidation of Complex Genetic Traits and
Diseases
Room 517D, Level 5, Convention Center
Moderator:
Eric Vilain, Univ. of California, Los Angel
USA
The debate of Nature versus Nurture has traditionall
been an intellectual battle between social
constructionists and biological determinists. Classic
twin studies have helped identify the respective
influence of genetics and environment for many trait
and diseases. But the difficulty to measure the spec
nature of environmental influence, combined with th
particularly arduous task of identifying specific DNA
variations associated with common traits and
disorders, has challenged the efficiency of genome-
wide associations studies of complex diseases.
Genetic and epigenetic twins studies, however, have
recently profoundly shifted the paradigm of heritable
and environmental effects, by providing a unified
measure for both. Epigenetic modifications provide
measurable marker of environmental influence, are
partially dependent on the genetic background, and
can be transmitted to the next generation. Decipheri
epigenetic changes on a large scale in twins
discordant for a variety of traits, and in the general
population, is about to revolutionize our approach of
the etiology of common diseases, and our
understanding of the molecular basis of heritable an
non-heritable factors. This internationally diverse
session will be dedicated to the memory of Dr. Leen
Peltonen, world leading human geneticist, who early
on understood the power of modern genetic and
epigenetic studies of twins.
10:30
AM
Introduction.
E. Vilain. UCLA, USA.
10:35
AM
Contributions of twin studies towards
elucidating disease etiology.
N. Martin. Univ. of
Queensland, Australia.
11:05
AM
Large scale methylation in discordant
twins.
T. Spector. King’s Col. London, U.K.
11:35
AM
Epigenetic differences in twins: Clues f
complex disorders.
A. Petronis. Univ. of Toronto,
Canada.
12:05
PM
Twins, sexual orientation and age.
E.
Vilain. UCLA, USA.