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Thursday, October 13
8:00
AM
–10:00
AM
Concurrent Invited Session II (24-29)
SESSION 27 – Cancer Genomics
Room 210, Level 2, Convention Center
Moderators:
Paul T. Spellman, Oregon Hlth. & Sci.
Univ., Benicia, CA, USA; Thomas J. Hudson, Ontario
Inst. for Cancer Res., Canada
Rapid developments in cancer genomics between
2008 and 2010, including The Cancer Genome Atlas
(TCGA) program from the United States and whole
genome sequencing of leukemia, breast, lung,
melanoma and other genomes, ushered a new era in
cancer research leading to systematic studies of
25,000 cancer genomes, as described in the April
2010 Nature paper by the International Cancer
Genome Consortium (ICGC). The ICGC projects aim to
elucidate the genomic and epigenomic alterations
found across 50 different types or subtypes of cancer
– a feat that promises to reveal the molecular basis of
the majority of cancers causing lethality across the
world. By Fall of 2011 several of these projects will
have made significant progress in the analysis of the
tumor types. The session described presents the
tumors that are likely to have made progress based on
current projections from our ICGC and TCGA
colleagues. Large-scale cancer genomics programs
are changing the paradigm for cancer research by 1)
providing detailed, comprehensive datasets through
publicly accessible databases, 2) making genotype-
phenotype correlations possible by providing genomic,
clinical and pathologic data together in a single
resource, 3) providing datasets of significant size to
enable statistically significant discoveries at high
resolution.
8:00
AM
Introduction.
T. J. Hudson. Ontario Inst. for
Cancer Res., Canada.
8:10
AM
The Cancer Genome Atlas.
S. Gabriel.
Broad Inst., Cambridge, MA, USA.
8:35
AM
The oral cancer genome.
P. P. Majumder.
Natl. Inst. of Biomed. Genomics, Kalyani, India.
9:00
AM
The Stomach Cancer Genome Project.
Y.
Lu. Beijing Inst. of Cancer Res., China.
9:25
AM
The pancreatic cancer genome.
J.
McPherson. Ontario Inst. for Cancer Res., Toronto,
Canada.
9:50
AM
Questions and answers.
P. T. Spellman.
Oregon Hlth. & Sci. Univ., Benicia, CA, USA.
Cameras and all other recording devices are
strictly prohibited
in all session rooms. Thank you for your cooperati
Thursday, October 13
8:00
AM
–10:00
AM
Concurrent Invited Session II (24-29)
SESSION 28 – Translational Approaches to
Mitochondrial Research
Room 520, Level 5, Convention Center
Moderator:
Fernando Scaglia, Baylor Col. of Med.,
USA
Mitochondria, the energy reactors of the cell, have
emerged as centers of attention in pathophysiology
and the field of mitochondrial research has recently
undergone a remarkable expansion. New and power
strategies for investigation of human biochemistry ar
being applied to the study of mitochondrial energy
production. These efforts include both the exploratio
of hundreds to thousands of candidate genes for
human phenotypes and diseases and proteomics
research. Moreover, other strategies such as functio
complementation cloning techniques in cell lines fro
patients are allowing us to identify and characterize
the genes associated with defects in the mitochondr
translation system that synthesizes the essential
structural components encoded in mtDNA. Recent
discoveries have sparked renewed appreciation for t
remarkably dynamic nature of these organelles.
Mitochondria constantly fuse and divide, and are
actively transported to specific subcellular locations.
Fission and fusion are essential for mammalian
development and defects in mitochondrial dynamics
lead to neuronal disease. Mitochondrial dysfunction
can underlie the pathological mechanism of commo
disorders. The hypothesis that human and animal
tumors could be favored by the impairment in
mitochondrial function resulting in a high rate of
glycolysis under aerobic conditions has been recentl
validated by the finding of somatic mtDNA mutation
in tumors. Further evidence has been provided by t
implication of structural OXPHOS genes in cancer. T
aim of this session will be to illustrate the recent
advances in the translational aspects of research in
mitochondrial biology.
8:00
AM
Introduction.
F. Scaglia. Baylor Col. of
Med., USA.
8:05
AM
The biogenesis and role of complex I i
human disease.
J. A. M. Smeitink. Radboud Univ.,
Nijmegen Med. Ctr., Netherlands.
8:30
AM
Characterization of new genes implicat
in mitochondrial translation.
E. A. Shoubridge.
Montreal Neurol. Inst. and Hosp., McGill Univ.,
Canada.
9:00
AM
The role of mitochondrial dynamics in
human disease.
D. C. Chan. Caltech, USA.
9:30
AM
Choosing between glycolysis and
oxidative phosphorylation: A tumor’s dilemma?
R
Rossignol. INSERM U688, Univ. Victor Segalen
Bordeaux 2, France.