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Wednesday, October 12
10:30
AM
–12:30
PM
Concurrent Invited Session I (4-9)
SESSION 5 – New Insights from Human Pain Genetic
Studies
Room 511, Level 5, Convention Center
Moderator:
Inna Belfer, Univ. of Pittsburgh, USA
Acute pain is adaptive and part of normal life; chronic
pain is a disabling disease. Pain perception and
chronicity are complex traits, affected by a number of
environmental and genetic factors. The genetic basis
of pain sensitivity in humans has been investigated
intensively over the past 10 years leading to discovery
of functionally significant polymorphisms which
influence human pain. These findings offer new
opportunities to understand the mechanisms of
widespread painful disorders, and to facilitate its
prevention. The recent development of genome-wide
methods that incorporate the use of molecular, cellular,
and genetic measurements into epidemiologic
evaluations greatly promote the discovery rate and
promise exciting new findings. Attendees will be
exposed to novel findings and novel approaches in the
field of pain genetics. New approaches to assessment
and measurement of pain phenotypes and mapping of
genetic loci to the common symptoms in the context
of clinical pain syndromes will be discussed.
10:30
AM
Introduction.
I. Belfer. Univ. of Pittsburgh,
USA.
10:35
AM
Novel findings from genetic studies of
pain: From rodent models to human clinical pain.
M. Costigan. Harvard Med. Sch., Charlestown, USA.
10:55
AM
Comparative genomics approach using
global functional analysis in Drosophila to identify
new candidate genes for human pain genetic
research.
G. G. Neely. Garvan Inst. of Med. Res.,
Sydney, Australia.
11:15
AM
Genetic risks in development of chronic
pain in humans.
L. Diatchenko. Univ. of North
Carolina at Chapel Hill, USA.
11:40
AM
Identification of the pain gene
CACNG2
using an integrated whole genome-based
approach.
J. Nissenbaum. Hebrew Univ. of Jerusalem,
Israel.
12:05
PM
COMT
as a gold standard candidate
gene for human pain research.
I. Belfer. Univ. of
Pittsburgh, USA.
12:25
PM
Questions and answers.
I. Belfer. Univ. of
Pittsburgh, USA.
Cameras and all other recording devices are
strictly prohibited
in all session rooms. Thank you for your cooperation
Wednesday, October 12
10:30
AM
–12:30
PM
Concurrent Invited Session I (4-9)
SESSION 6 – Beyond Genome-Wide Association Stu
Integrating Transcriptome, Proteome, and Pathway
Data in the Genetic Dissection of Complex Traits
Room 210, Level 2, Convention Center
Moderators:
Marylyn D. Ritchie, Vanderbilt Univ., US
Nancy J. Cox, Univ. of Chicago, USA
Genomic technologies are generating dense, rich, hi
quality measures of genomic variation and full geno
sequencing will only add to this wealth of data. Muc
of these data are deposited into national databases
and/or made openly available to the research
community with the goal that researchers can and wi
combine these data to develop new information and
knowledge. Methodological advances in the analysis
these data and the ability to integrate these data acr
experiments have simply not kept pace with this floo
of data. This critical need extends to integrating data
results, and approaches across studies and
phenotypes, including a variety of data types such a
proteomic, gene expression, imaging, clinical laborat
data, metabolomics, and pharmacogenomics. The
current paradigm in biomedical research is that multi
studies are needed, exploring the question from
different perspectives to elucidate architecture. It is
imperative that analytic methods be developed to
combine potential datasets in ways that will produce
additional information such that the whole will be
greater than the sum of the parts. The utility of our
monumental investment in data generation will
ultimately depend on having innovative strategies an
study designs that make full use of multiple data
sources in an integrated analytical framework. This
session is devoted to discussing some of the latest
advances in the integration of genomic data with oth
types of biological data to extract the maximal amou
of information from genomic studies and enhance ou
ability to gain knowledge about the genetic architect
of common, complex traits.
10:30
AM
Introduction.
N. J. Cox. Univ. of Chicag
USA.
10:35
AM
Function-based GWAS to enhance
discovery.
N. J. Cox. Univ. of Chicago, USA.
10:55
AM
Leveraging comprehensive annotation
and pathway information in large scale genomic
studies.
N. J. Schork. The Scripps Res. Inst., La
Jolla, USA.
11:15
AM
Network-based diagnosis and
personalized medicine.
T. Ideker. Univ. of Californi
San Diego, USA.
11:35
AM
Meta-dimensional analysis of
phenotypes.
M. D. Ritchie. Vanderbilt Univ., USA.
11:55
AM
Integrating interaction and pathway
association analysis in genome-wide associatio
studies.
T. Becker. Univ. of Bonn, Germany.
12:15
PM
Questions and answers.
M. D. Ritchie.
Vanderbilt Univ., USA.